Quick Facts

Manufacture Date1925
Other NamesGE Demonstrator #9681
Railroad Of RecordCentral Railroad of New Jersey
ManufacturerAmerican Locomotive Company (ALCO), General Electric, and Ingersoll Rand
Rolling Stock TypeDiesel Locomotive
TypeBox Cab Switcher
ClassSD-3
Speed30 mph
Weight60 tons
Driver Diameter36 in.
Tractive Effort37,200 lbs

Description

Advent of Diesel-electric Power 

Despite the domination of steam locomotives on the railroad for almost 70 years, new technologies began to emerge around the turn of the century that would eventually revolutionize railroad travel. Although diesel engines first appeared at the end of the nineteenth century, it was not until General Electric combined it with electricity in 1917, that the technology became suitable for locomotives. Still, railroads did not incorporate these unproven locomotives until government, in the 1920s, mandated railroad companies to eliminate air-polluting steamers from urban rail yards. In 1925, General Electric, in partnership with Ingersoll-Rand and the American Locomotive Company (ALCO), created the first commercially successful diesel-electric locomotive, identified as the No. 1000. 

 

History of the CNJ No. 1000

This first diesel-electric off the assembly line was purchased by the Central Railroad of New Jersey (CNJ). Almost immediately, other railroads followed suit as they discovered that diesel-electrics were more efficient yard switchers because of their maneuverability and cost-effective operation, leading to the dieselization of the American railroading fleet and the eventual demise of the steam era. The CNJ No. 1000 served for more than 30 years in the Bronx, New York rail yards, where B&O freight trains bound for New York terminated and were served by this unit. 

 

Restoration Support 

The CNJ No. 1000 was cosmetically restored in 2021 to its historic 1950s paint scheme featuring the iconic Statue of Liberty emblem. This restoration was completed in memory of Robert D. Timpany, Trustee of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, and made possible with the generous support of individual donors and the Baltimore National Heritage Area. 

Did You Know?

The first instance of telecommunications, a telegram sent by Samuel Morse, was received at Mt Clare Station in 1838.

Ransom007
Anaheim, CA

The roundhouse was my favorite part, because it gives a true feel for what goes on in a roundhouse—the cars are stationary, but seeing the actual tracks is eye-opening.

Close Search